Forskningsartikler - Side 2 av 14 - Nasjonal kompetansetjeneste for aldring og helse

Nature Genetics, 2021

A genome-wide association study with 1,126,563 individuals identifies new risk loci for Alzheimer’s disease

Abstract

Abstract
Late-onset Alzheimer’s disease is a prevalent age-related polygenic disease that accounts for 50–70% of dementia cases. Currently, only a fraction of the genetic variants underlying Alzheimer’s disease have been identified. Here we show that increased sample sizes allowed identification of seven previously unidentified genetic loci contributing to Alzheimer’s disease. This study highlights microglia, immune cells and protein catabolism as relevant to late-onset Alzheimer’s disease, while identifying and prioritizing previously unidentified genes of potential interest. We anticipate that these results can be included in larger meta-analyses of Alzheimer’s disease to identify further genetic variants that contribute to Alzheimer’s pathology.

Forfattere

Douglas P. Wightman, Iris E. Jansen, Jeanne E. Savage, Alexey A. Shadrin, Shahram Bahrami, Dominic Holland, Arvid Rongve, Sigrid Børte, Bendik S. Winsvold, Ole Kristian Drange, Amy E. Martinsen, Anne Heidi Skogholt, Cristen Willer, Geir Bråthen, Ingunn Bosnes, Jonas Bille Nielsen, Lars G. Fritsche, Laurent F. Thomas, Linda M. Pedersen, Maiken E. Gabrielsen, Marianne Bakke Johnsen, Tore Wergeland Meisingset, Wei Zhou, Petroula Proitsi, Angela Hodges, Richard Dobson, Latha Velayudhan, 23andMe Research Team, Julia M. Sealock, Lea K. Davis, Nancy L. Pedersen, Chandra A. Reynolds, Ida K. Karlsson, Sigurdur Magnusson, Hreinn Stefansson, Steinunn Thordardottir, Palmi V. Jonsson, Jon Snaedal, Anna Zettergren, Ingmar Skoog, Silke Kern, Margda Waern, Henrik Zetterberg, Kaj Blennow, Eystein Stordal, Kristian Hveem, John-Anker Zwart, Lavinia Athanasiu, Per Selnes, Ingvild Saltvedt, Sigrid B. Sando, Ingun Ulstein, Srdjan Djurovic, Tormod Fladby, Dag Aarsland, Geir Selbæk, Stephan Ripke, Kari Stefansson, Ole A. Andreassen & Danielle Posthuma

Aging & Mental Health, 2021

Trajectories of relationship quality in dementia: a longitudinal study in eight European countries

Abstract

Abstract
Objectives: Relationship quality (RQ) between a person with dementia and a family carer may influence their health and quality of life. However, evidence regarding its course and influencing factors is limited. We aimed to explore RQ trajectories in dementia, and identify predictors of change.
Methods: We analysed longitudinal data from a cohort of 350 community-dwelling people with dementia and their informal carers, participating in the Actifcare study in eight European countries. The Positive Affect Index, rated separately by both people with dementia and their carers, assessed RQ. Other measures included the Neuropsychiatric Inventory Questionnaire (regarding persons with dementia), and the Relative Stress Scale, Sense of Coherence Scale and Lubben Social Network Scale (for carers). Trajectories and influencing factors were explored applying a latent growth model (LGM).
Results: RQ in the group of carers declined over 1 year, but RQ scores for the persons with dementia did not change. Higher stress in carers negatively influenced their baseline RQ ratings. Carer sense of coherence and being a spouse were associated with more positive baseline RQ carer assessments. Higher levels of neuropsychiatric symptoms were linked to decline in carers’ RQ, whereas social support was associated with more positive RQ trajectories.
Conclusion: This study provides a valuable insight into the course of RQ. LGM proved useful to explore the factors that influence RQ trajectories and variability within- and between-persons. Our findings emphasise the importance of carer-perceived social support and sense of coherence, and of reducing neuropsychiatric symptoms, in maintaining a good RQ.

Forfattere

Maria J Marques, Eva Y L Tan, Bob Woods, Hannah Jelley, Liselot Kerpershoek, Louise Hopper, Kate Irving, Anja Bieber, Astrid Stephan, Anders Sköldunger, Britt-Marie Sjölund, Geir Selbæk, Janne Røsvik, Orazio Zanetti, Daniel M Portolani, João Marôco, Marjolein de Vugt, Frans Verhey, Manuel Gonçalves-Pereira, Actifcare Consortium

International Psychogeriatrics, 2021

Neuropsychiatric symptoms and brain morphology in patients with mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s disease with dementia

Abstract

Abstract: We present associations between neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) and brain morphology in a large sample of patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer’s disease with dementia (AD dementia).Several studies assessed NPS factor structure in MCI and AD dementia, but we know of no study that tested for associations between NPS factors and brain morphology. The use of factor scores increases parsimony and power. For transparency, we performed an additional analysis with selected Neuropsychiatric Inventory – Questionnaire (NPI-Q) items. Including regional cortical thickness, cortical and subcortical volumes, we examined associations between NPS and brain morphology across the whole brain in an unbiased fashion. We reported both statistical significance and effect sizes, using linear models adjusted for multiple comparisons by false discovery rate (FDR). Moreover, we included an interaction term for diagnosis and could thereby compare associations of NPS and brain morphology between MCI and AD dementia.We found an association between the factor elation and thicker right anterior cingulate cortex across MCI and AD dementia. Associations between the factors depression to thickness of the banks of the left superior temporal sulcus and psychosis to the left post-central volume depended on diagnosis: in MCI these associations were positive, in AD dementia negative.Our findings indicate that NPS in MCI and AD dementia are not exclusively associated with atrophy and support previous findings of associations between NPS and mainly frontotemporal brain structures.
Objectives: Neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) are common in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer’s disease with dementia (AD dementia), but their brain structural correlates are unknown. We tested for associations between NPS and MRI-based cortical and subcortical morphometry in patients with MCI and AD dementia.
Design: Cross-sectional.

Settings: Conducted in Norway.
Participants: Patients with MCI (n = 102) and AD dementia (n = 133) from the Memory Clinic and the Geriatric Psychiatry Unit at Oslo University Hospital.
Measurements: Neuropsychiatric Inventory – Questionnaire (NPI-Q) severity indices were reduced using principal component analysis (PCA) and tested for associations with 170 MRI features using linear models and false discovery rate (FDR) adjustment. We also tested for differences between groups. For transparency, we added analyses with selected NPI-Q items.
Results: PCA revealed four factors: elation, psychosis, depression, and motor behavior.FDR adjustment revealed a significant positive association (B = 0.20, pFDR < 0.005) between elation and thickness of the right caudal anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) across groups, and significant interactions between diagnosis and psychosis (B = −0.48, pFDR < 0.0010) on the left post-central volume and between diagnosis and depression (B = −0.40, pFDR < 0.005) on the thickness of the banks of the left superior temporal sulcus. Associations of apathy, anxiety, and nighttime behavior to the left temporal lobe were replicated.
Conclusions: The positive association between elation and ACC thickness suggests that mechanisms other than atrophy underly elation. Interactions between diagnosis and NPS on MRI features suggest different mechanisms of NPS in our MCI and AD dementia samples. The results contribute to a better understanding of NPS brain mechanisms in MCI and AD dementia.

Forfattere

Nikias Siafarikas, Dag Alnæs, Jennifer Monereo-Sanchez, Martina J Lund, Geir Selbæk, Maria Stylianou-Korsnes, Karin Persson, Maria Lage Barca, Ina Selseth Almdahl, Tormod Fladby, Dag Aarsland, Ole A Andreassen, Lars T Westlye

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Dementia and geriatric cognitive disorders, 2021

Locus of Control and Its Associations with Depressive Symptoms amongst People with Dementia

Abstract

Introduction:
Depression is common amongst people with dementia. This study examines whether locus of control (LoC), a perceived control construct influential in the coping process, is related to depressive symptoms in this population.
Methods:
In this prospective observational study, 257 community-dwelling older adults with a confirmed dementia diagnosis were included. At baseline, measures of depressive symptoms, LoC, cognition, independent functional ability, general health, dementia severity, and dementia disease insight were collected. At follow-up, measures of depressive symptoms and cognition were collected. Multiple linear regression using degree of depressive symptoms as measured with Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale as a dependent variable was applied to assess whether LoC was associated with depressive symptoms at baseline and followup while controlling for covariates.
Results:
LoC (p < 0.001), general health (p = 0.003), and insight (p = 0.010) were associated with severity of depressive symptoms at baseline, accounting for 28% of the variance. LoC (p = 0.025) and depressive symptoms (p < 0.001) at baseline were associated with severity of depressive symptoms at follow-up, accounting for 56.3% of the variance.
Conclusion:
LoC was significantly associated with severity of depressive symptoms in people with dementia at baseline and at follow-up. Attention to LoC may be valuable for our understanding of depression in people with dementia, and interventions targeting depression could benefit from including a focus on internalizing perceived control. However, these findings are novel, and more research is needed.

Forfattere

Ingeborg Halse, Guro Hanevold Bjørkløf, Knut Engedal, Geir Selbæk, Maria Lage Barca

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Aging & Mental Health, 2021

Alcohol consumption among older adults with symptoms of cognitive decline consulting specialist health care

Abstract

Objectives: To explore alcohol consumption among older Norwegian adults with symptoms of cognitive decline, assess the agreement between the reports of older adults and their next of kin regarding a person’s alcohol consumption, and explore clinical and sociodemographic variables associated with agreement.

Method: Alcohol consumption was measured among 3608 older adults consulting specialist health care for symptoms of cognitive decline. Agreement between the participant and their next of kin regarding the participant’s alcohol consumption was assessed with a weighted kappa (κ). A logistic regression analysis for hierarchical data was used to explore variables associated with agreement.
Results: Both the participants and their next of kin reported that more than 20% of the participants consumed alcohol 1-3 times a week, and that approximately 10% consumed alcohol four or more times a week. The agreement between the participant’s and their next of kin’s report regarding the participant’s alcohol consumption was high (κ = .852), and variables associated with agreement were no cognitive decline, not drinking alcohol during the last year or ever as reported by the participant, and low agitation scores on a psychiatric assessment.
Conclusion: This paper found alcohol consumption among older adults with symptoms of cognitive decline that was above the national average in Norway. This is also the first paper to demonstrate that a next of kin can be a reliable source of information regarding older adults’ alcohol consumption. Health personnel should consider these findings when performing medical assessments or developing interventions for older adults.

Forfattere

Ben Kamsvaag, Sverre Bergh, Jūratė Šaltytė Benth, Geir Selbæk, Kjerstin Tevik, Anne-Sofie Helvik

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BMC Health Services Research, 2021

Person-centered dementia care in home care services – highly recommended but still challenging to obtain: a qualitative interview study

Abstract

Background: Dementia is one of the main causes of disability and dependence in older people, and people with dementia need comprehensive healthcare services, preferably in their own homes. A well-organized home care service designed for people with dementia is necessary to meet their needs for health- and social care. Therefore, it is important to gain knowledge about how people with dementia experience the home care service and if the service responds to their wishes and needs. The aim of this study was to explore the experience of home care services among people with dementia, to understand the continuity in services, how the service was adapted to people with dementia, and how the patient experienced person-centered care and shared decision-making.

Methods: We used a qualitative, exploratory design based on a phenomenological-hermeneutic approach and performed individual in-depth interviews with persons with dementia. A convenience sample of 12 persons with moderate to severe degrees of dementia from four Norwegian municipalities participated in the study. The interviews were conducted in February 2019.

Results: The findings identified that the participants appreciated the possibility to stay safely in their own homes and mostly experienced good support from staff. They expressed various views and understanding of the service and experienced limited opportunities for user involvement and individualized, tailored service. The overall theme summarizing the findings was: «It is difficult for people with dementia to understand and influence home care services, but the services facilitate the possibility to stay at home and feel safe with support from staff.»

Conclusion: The participants did not fully understand the organization of the care and support they received from the home care services, but they adapted to the service without asking for changes based on their needs or desires. Although person-centered care is recommended both nationally and internationally, the participants experienced little inclusion in defining the service they received, and it was perceived as unclear how they could participate in shared decision-making.

Forfattere

Kari-Anne Hoel, Anne Marie Mork Rokstad, Ingvild Hjorth Feiring, Bjørn Lichtwarck, Geir Selbæk, Sverre Bergh

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International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, 2021

Being sheltered from a demanding everyday life: experiences of the next of kin to people with dementia attending farm-based daycare

Abstract

Purpose: Farm-based daycare (FDC) is a type of daycare service for people with dementia. The aim of the present study was to explore the next of kin’s experiences with FDC and how the service may affect their daily life.

Methods: The study has a qualitative, descriptive design. Eight semi-structured interviews with next of kin were conducted. The data were analysed in accordance with content analysis.

Results: We identified three main categories: (1) I am fine when you are fine, (2) Significant aspects of the service at the farm, and (3) FDC as a part of the dementia trajectory. The findings were summarized in one overarching, latent theme: «Being sheltered from a demanding everyday life».

Conclusions: The findings indicate that next of kin’s experience of respite is closely connected to the well-being of their relatives at the FDC and the quality of the service. FDC provides significant support through a part of the trajectory of dementia. Despite experiencing respite and support, next of kin continue to struggle with ethical and moral decisions about the futures of their relatives with dementia.

Forfattere

Liv Bjerknes Taranrød, Ingeborg Pedersen, Øyvind Kirkevold, Siren Eriksen

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Aging & Mental Health, 2021

Pain in nursing home residents with dementia and its association to quality of life

Abstract

Objectives: We aimed to describe pain, use of analgesics and quality of life (QoL) in people with dementia admitted to a Norwegian nursing home (NH), and to explore if and how pain was associated with their QoL when adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics, other health conditions and use of analgesics.

Method: A total of 953 Norwegian NH residents with dementia (mean age 84.0, SD 7.5 years, 35.8% men) were included at admission to the NH. Pain and QoL were assessed using the Mobilization-Observation-Behavior-Intensity-Dementia-2 (MOBID-2) Pain Scale and the Quality of Life in Late-Stage Dementia (QUALID) scale, respectively. Severity of dementia, personal level of activities of daily living, general medical health, neuropsychiatric symptoms, and the use of psychotropic drugs and analgesics were assessed.

Results: In total, 36% of the participants had clinically relevant pain intensity (MOBID-2 ≥ 3) and 52% received analgesics. Paracetamol was most frequently prescribed (45%). In an adjusted linear mixed model, more severe pain was associated with higher QUALID total scores, indicating poorer QoL (regression coefficient 0.52, 95% CI 0.36-0.69).

Conclusion: Pain prevalence at NH admission was high in residents with dementia; half used analgesics, particularly paracetamol. More severe pain was associated with poorer QoL when adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics, other health conditions, and use of analgesics. The routine assessment of pain at NH admission can uncover undiagnosed and untreated pain and allow for adequate non-pharmacological and pharmacological pain management and likely increased QoL.

Forfattere

Anne-Sofie Helvik, Sverre Bergh, Jūratė Šaltytė Benth, Geir Selbæk, Bettina S Husebø, Kjerstin Tevik

Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare, 2021

Health Professionals’ Experiences Regarding Alcohol Consumption and Its Relation to Older Care Recipient’s Health and Well-Being

Abstract

Background: Alcohol consumption among older people is expected to increase in the years ahead. Health professionals’ experiences of, and reflections on, alcohol consumption and its relation to well-being are thus important to the provision of adequate and high-quality treatment and care.

Aim: To investigate health professionals’ experiences and reflections about alcohol consumption among older people and how it is related to their health and well-being.

Methods: A case study design approach was adopted, incorporating three qualitative studies involving Norwegian health professionals. The health professionals interviewed included workers in nursing homes, home care professionals and general practitioners.

Results: The study revealed a diversity of views and reflections on alcohol consumption, its facilitation, and the impact on the health and well-being of older patients and care recipients. Six themes were revealed by the three studies: (i) the facilitation of alcohol consumption to promote and normalize life in nursing homes, (ii) the restriction of unhealthy alcohol consumption, (iii) attempts to discuss alcohol consumption with care recipients, (iv) the initiation of collaboration with informal caregivers in restricting alcohol consumption, (v) minimalizing the dialogue regarding alcohol consumption to guard patient privacy and (vi) a desire for joint action and a national political strategy.

Conclusion: Health professionals working in NHs, in-home and GPs find it difficult to discuss the use and elevated use of alcohol with older people for whom they have care and treatment responsibilities. In general, they are concerned that such conversations infringe on the principles governing an individual’s autonomy. However, because they are aware that elevated alcohol intake may have a negative impact on health and well-being, they also express a need for guidelines how they in a better and open minded way can discuss the use and elevated use of alcohol with the patients they care for.

Forfattere

Aud Johannessen, Kjerstin Tevik, Knut Engedal, Gro Gade Haanes, Anne-Sofie Helvik

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